‘Amorphous forms peeled from the canvas.’ Franco Kappl shows an excerpt of his work in Munich

‘Amorphous forms peeled from the canvas.’ Franco Kappl shows an excerpt of his work in Munich

Art critics like to compare the creation process of his pictures with the way a sculptor works; the effect on the viewer with a stage situation on which a play takes place. Franco Kappl himself describes his style as ‘gesturally abstract. As a painting that peels amorphous forms out of the canvas.’ The Austrian painter presented works from the past two years of his work at the vernissage of the 29th exhibition of [foryouandyourcustomers] in Munich. Until October 2019, visitors can get their own impression of Franco Kappl’s work.

Sali Oelhafen, Birgit Zinner, Bodo Korsig and now Franco Kappl -foryouandyourcustomers Munich is already the fourth permanent exhibition in a row since the location was founded. ‘Art as a fundamental and therefore fixed component of our corporate culture, as a connecting and relationship-promoting element for us employees, our customers and, of course, every art lover and interested person who wants to view the exhibition’, Managing Director Jens Plattfaut was already looking forward to his guests before the vernissage. A short time later, numerous guests arrived to the third floor of the Schwabing office in Munich. Among them were employees, family members, friends and friends of friends who first came into contact with our company, partly also for the first time with the painter Franco Kappl and his work.

The relationship between foryouandyourcustomers and the Austrian artist has been cultivated for years. In 2014 it was his turn to present the first solo exhibition in the spacious offices of the Vienna office. An exhibition that not only captivated the many visitors on site for a long time, but also remained positively in the artist’s memory.

‘It’s not about decorating spaces, it’s about art as such, and that’s why I’m so happy about this exhibition.’

Sali Oelhafen, Art curator of the exhibition

‘Office exhibitions are usually catastrophic or at least very, very difficult to arrange,’ said Franco Kappl. But he didn’t have to think twice when curator Sali Oelhafen’s request arrived. ‘Normally, exhibitions of this kind are a form of office practice, but this here in Munich is something quite different. This is because foryouandyourcustomers has a completely different approach to art than many other companies have. The whole office is still used for working and yet an atmosphere like in a gallery is created, a special atmosphere for guests and employees, where the pictures constantly have to assert themselves in an everyday room. It’s not about decorating rooms, it’s about art as such, and that’s why I’m so happy about this exhibition.’

Let the works have their effect at a distance.

‘White Appears’, art historian Carola Conradt titled her introduction to Kappl’s work and gave the attendees her thought for the first walk through the exhibition. ‘Franco Kappl’s black and white paintings are reminiscent of darkness with light effects. Or even more, of a stage situation on which a play takes place. White steps onto the stage and realises itself there. Black paint creates a surface for a gripping staging of painting: Brightly bright – sometimes glistening, sometimes pensive – breakthroughs occur inside the picture, kidnapping in depths or formations that throw themselves into the space, seem to grow out plastically. The white meets the dark abruptly, enjoys a strong appearance: expressive, dynamic, in wide colour swings, to then fade away, with a thin brush, drawing.’

The Austrian artist and Sali Oelhafen had arranged 33 small-format, sketch-like paintings on paper or oversized canvas for the show. Accurately precise and reduced to the point, hung ‘generously according to the spatial conditions, taking into account angles, connecting and breaking, creating a spatial dramaturgy,’ as Franco Kappl himself described it. Or ‘lovingly and inspiringly arranged’, as one visitor called it, who, even after walking several times, ‘hasn’t had enough of the pictures yet’. Like her, many visitors to Herzogstraße 60 were in the same mood that evening. From the centre of the meeting in the entrance area of the office, individual guests or groups continually detached themselves, walked through the individual rooms, looked at the individual pictures, series and their interplay from a distance, let them have an effect on them from a distance, or came very close to the works, with a view to the process of creation, colouring, brushstrokes – spellbound, fascinated, questioning and, in isolated cases, astonished.

The impressions of Franco Kappl Work – partly based on individual pictures, partly on the entire work route – were discussed controversially among the participants this evening: Dark versus luminous, constricted versus expansive; the contrasts in the perception of the 56-year-old’s painting, however, were ultimately united in a single conclusion: impressive, touching and enriching. A painting in the field of vision whose basic theme, according to Franco Kappl, sparingly describing it to a guest, ‘revolves mainly around black and white, light and dark. Amorphous forms that inspire interpretation, comparison with real objects, which is not my intention at all’, or as Carola Conradt put it: ‘It’s not about figurativeness, even if the compositions always tempt you to it and the titles sometimes suggest it. Franco Kappl’s painting is thoroughly abstract. It’s purely about the drifting of painting on the picture carrier’.

Franco Kappl himself visibly enjoyed being together with those interested in art. ‘The interest in my painting and also the feedback to the works was really great. It is my wish that the exhibition offers the guests a great experience and that I reach out to the public with my work. And when I look around here, it seems to me that I have succeeded in doing so today.’

You can still discover what colour can do in Franco Kappl’s paintings up to and including October 2019 after registering at +49 89 383 46 151 in Munich.